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Tune In To Your Own Emotions PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 06 February 2012 09:10

 115-ZF

By John H. Zenger, Joseph R. Folkman & Scott K. Edinger


We all have good days and bad days. Nearly everyone who has worked inside organizations for a few years can recall someone coming to the boss’s assistant to ask, “What kind of mood is the boss in today?” The mood swings of many bosses are extremely wide and carefully monitored.

We hope you personally have lots more good days than bad ones. But it isn’t unusual to become aware that you are a bit irritated about something or someone and that this irritation shows through to others. (We’re not encouraging that, mind you, but we’re realists.) The message to the would-be inspirational leader is quite obvious. If you’re having a bad day, limit your interactions with those about you. As much as you can, guard against expressing negative feelings in your interactions with others. If possible, wait until you are in a better mood before setting up any optional meetings, conferences, or phone calls.

Let us share a story. A pilot was on the way to the plane and was encountered by several colleagues who proceeded to badger him about his lack of support for a recent activity that had been initiated by the pilot’s union. At the end of this confrontation the pilot notified operations that he was not fit to fly the plane and the flight was cancelled. Passengers were obviously perturbed about this turn of events. But this pilot was aware that his emotional state prevented him from being focused on flying in a totally safe manner, and that delegating the task to the copilot would not provide the fail-safe system of having two competent pilots on board in case of an emergency.

This is an interesting lesson to leaders in businesses who probably should, on some occasions, disqualify themselves from being in command, based on their emotional state.

Conversely, expand your interactions on those days when you’re feeling especially positive and enthusiastic. Reach out to more people. Pepper your conversation with positive expressions that will elevate the mood of those about you.

If you are by nature on the pessimistic side of the ledger, we encourage you to investigate the remarkable work on optimism being done by Martin Seligman. His book Learned Optimism is an extremely useful treatise that presents compelling evidence of why you should work to become more optimistic (health, career success, marital success, and daily happiness all hinge on it). Better yet, the book gives you practical exercises to help you get there.  

 

To kick start your organization with an EQ culture, call:  6631 8322   6875 4871

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Last Updated on Monday, 24 November 2014 11:27